Libby Mahoney

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Liz Hingley Photography Exhibition

We are delighted to present Home Made in Smethwick, an exhibition of photographs by local photographer Liz Hingley, which will tour to six Sandwell libraries. Liz worked with residents for two years to create an intimate photographic portrait of the people and the food cooked in Smethwick in the Black Country, one of the most culturally diverse towns in the UK. A book of the work was published in August 2016 but this is the first time an exhibition of photographs has been exhibited publicly.

The launch event was in January 2017, at Smethwick Library but at the start of each leg of the tour there will be a special afternoon preview with the chance to see the work and taste homemade bread from Albert, a project participant.

We are delighted to present Home Made in Smethwick, an exhibition of photographs by local photographer Liz Hingley, which will come to Tipton Library from 13 April to 12 May 2017.

Liz has worked with residents for the last two years to create an intimate photographic portrait of the people and the food cooked in Smethwick in the Black Country, one of the most culturally diverse towns in the UK. A book of the work was published in August 2016 but this is the first time an exhibition of photographs has been exhibited publicly.

The exhibition will be at Tipton Library, Unity Walk, Owen Street, Tipton, DY4 8QL until Friday 12th May.

This event is part of a series of special exhibitions and film screenings brought to you by Multistory and Sandwell libraries.

Free entrance – no ticket required.

Tour Schedule:
Blackheath Library (0121 559 1884) 15 May – 9 June
Central Library, West Bromwich (0121 569 4904) 12 June – 10 July


Changes to Heritage Lottery Fund Grants for Churches

From September 2017, the Heritage Lottery Fund’s (HLF) Grants for Places of Worship programme will close to new applications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

In its place, funding for repairs to places of worship will be available through HLF’s existing Our Heritage (up to £100,000) and Heritage Grants (up to £5million) programmes.  These grants will be available to both listed and unlisted places of worship.

Under the new arrangements, 100% of works and activities could be funded with no requirement for partnership funding, through the Our Heritage Programme. For larger schemes, more money will be available for individual places of worship. The Grants for Places of Worship awards were limited to £250,000 per application. Under Heritage Grants, applicants can apply for up to £5m per application.

Full details of the changes, together with details of HLF grants available for churches, can be found on the Historic Religious Buildings Alliance website. Alternatively, go directly to the Heritage Lottery Funds Website by clicking here to find out more.

Source: National Churches Trust


Hip Hop Heritage

Tell us about yourself and your affiliation to the organisation you are involved in.

My name is Martin Jones, and I’m currently the Treasurer of Hip Hop Heritage. My main claim to fame is that I was an entertainment agent in the 1980s, and actor/musician/celeb Goldie’s manager and agent from 1984-90.

Tell us about your organisation and what it does for your local community.

We are an unincorporated charitable association. Our mission is to document and promote the work of Hip Hop’s early pioneers in the UK.

We ran a successful Heritage Lottery Fund ‘Our Heritage’ programme in 2014-15, called ‘The Early Years of UK Hip Hop Archive Project’, based on my photo collection from the 1980s.

What is your organisation’s proudest achievement?

We created and catalogued a 1,500 image record called the ‘Zulu Dawn Archive’, which is based at Dudley Archives and can be viewed at blackcountryhistory.org

In our early days we staged two exhibitions at The Public arts centre in West Bromwich.

Our dancers also hold the Guinness World Record for the most performers motion-captured in real time (19), surpassing the previous record set during filming for Lord of the Rings (15).

What is the most valuable lesson you have learnt about working with people in your local community?

It took us a while to find the right people for our committee. It’s not easy, and takes time to find people who are genuinely committed to your goals and who are in it for the right reasons – however now we have an excellent committee.

What is your experience of support received from SCVO?

We were delighted with the help and advice we received from the SCVO Small Groups Advisor when we were setting up the organisation.

What are your plans for the future and some of the challenges you face?

Our plans include an exhibition called ‘Afterlife’, which we hope to stage at Wolverhampton Arena Theatre’s Artsfest. The show uses the motion capture files of top B Boy breakdancers of the 1980s that we recorded in 2015, and turns them into animated avatars, which will then form part of our archive.

We will also document the technical design process of how the dance figures are modelled and animated.

They will become a permanent, detailed record of the dancers’ trademark moves from the early era of B Boying, recorded while the dancers were still able to perform their moves.

How can SCVO help support your organisation in the future?

We have found the SCVO Meet the Funders events very useful, to identify potential funding sources and to meet others who are in the same position and encountering the same issues as us.


Tipton Library – “For Shakespeare and St George Fun Day”

Tipton Library is holding a “For Shakespeare and St George Fun Day” in honour of the birthday of William Shakespeare and of course St George. It’s a free event for all the family to enjoy with opportunities to get creative with children’s crafts, eat cake or just simply listen to Tipton Community Choir.

The fun day will be held at:

Tipton Library, 17 Unity Walk, Tipton, DY4 8QL on
Saturday 22nd April 10.30am—12.30pm

Activities include:

Free face painting and children’s crafts
Games
Toy sale
Community stalls
A special performance from the Tipton Community Choir
Home-made cakes and refreshments by Sally Gutteridge

For more information on the fun day please contact Tipton Library on 0121 557 1796.


Eleven Charities Fined for Data Protection Breaches

The Information Commissioner’s Office has fined eleven charities that breached the Data Protection Act by misusing donors’ personal data.

ICO investigations found many of the charities secretly screened millions of donors so they could target them for additional funds. Some charities traced and targeted new or lapsed donors by piecing together personal information obtained from other sources. And some traded personal details with other charities creating a large pool of donor data for sale.

A summary of how each charity breached the law can be found here.

The Information Commissioner has exercised her discretion in significantly reducing the level of today’s fines, taking into account the risk of adding to any distress caused to donors by the charities’ actions. The same approach was taken to fines issued to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (£25,000) and British Heart Foundation (£18,000) in December.

Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said: “Millions of people will have been affected by these charities’ contravention of the law. They will be upset to learn the way their personal information has been analysed and shared by charities they trusted with their details and their donations.

To read the Charity Digital News article in full click here.


Instagram For Charities: How Can You Make The Most Of It?

More and more organisations are using Instagram to reach a wider audience. In 2013, a survey of 100 charities found that none of them had a presence on the popular image-sharing app. Since then, the number of charities using the platform has grown dramatically, and it has become a force to be reckoned with.

1) Why Should Your Charity Be on Instagram?
You need to be part of the conversation.

If your posts are topical, you have the potential to reach an extremely wide audience. Charities and nonprofits are often rich with compelling stories and imagery – Instagram is a great way to visually share and bring them to a new audience.
Reaching a wide audience.

Instagram is first and foremost a community-led platform – and the fastest growing one, too, with 600 million monthly users and counting. Instagram is a great platform to reach the next generation of supporters and donors – both millennials and Gen Z. In fact, 70% of all young millennials are on the platform.

Introduce yourself.
Instagram users tend to use the platform as a discovery tool – to find inspiration, engage with ideas, and find out new things. This provides a great opportunity for charities, especially as most of the content in people’s Instagram feeds is from people they don’t know, making it the perfect place to introduce your organisation or cause to a new audience.

2) What Content Should You Be Sharing?
Built for mobile.

Images that work best are compelling, consistent, and tell the viewer everything they need to know in one frame. It doesn’t have to cost the earth, either – Instagram is built for mobile, so images taken on a smartphone work well. It’s worth A/B testing different types of content to see what resonates with your audience.

Be recognisable.

Well-crafted images help drive engagement – it is essential to have your brand incorporated somehow in most images, whether its your product, a logo, a colour, or your name. This is important because people can ‘regram’ your image from their own accounts, which is fantastic in terms of reaching new audiences. However, you don’t want to lose any brand cache, so the image should have strong branding, if possible.

Keep it real.

According to Instagram, in 2016, being amusing is the top attribute millennials associate with content they like to follow (57%), followed by creative content (52%), beautiful content (48%) and inspiring content (43%). But remember – don’t force it! It’s also important to be authentic.

To read the full Charity Digital News article click here.


Small, Local Charities Set to Feel the Benefit of Skills Training

The Foundation for Social Improvement has been awarded a grant totalling £199,580 to run a two year training programme, helping small, local charities and community groups develop their fundraising skills – including digital skills.

The programme run by the FSI in partnership with LocalGiving, the Small Charities Coalition and Charity Finance Group, will provide over 5,000 fundraising training opportunities. It will include face-to-face events across the country, webinars and online learning resources, one-to-one advice and consultancy appointments, fundraising campaign planning support, and intensive mentoring matches. Training will be subsidised, helping organisations to take part who may not normally have the resources to attend.

The training will be for small, local charities and community groups with an annual income of up to £1m, which have a local focus within England.

Minister for Civil Society, Rob Wilson said: “Small, local charities and community groups provide essential support for local people and are the backbone of our communities helping to build a fairer society that benefits everyone, not just the privileged few.

“I want to help them be more resilient and sustainable, and this training programme will give them valuable skills so they can continue their vital work helping to support people up and down the country.”

Details of the training events will be added to the FSI’s website as they become available, with online resources for those who might not be able to attend the training.

Source: Charity Digital News


New-look Charity Digital Toolkit Launched

Following the launch of the much talked about Charity Digital Skills Report, which revealed that many UK charities are still struggling to get to grips with digital, Skills Platform and Zoe Amar Communications have launched the Charity Digital Toolkit.

This latest release is a sequel to the successful Charity Social Media Toolkit and showcases best practice, expert insight and practical tips to directly help charities navigate through digital transformation.

The Charity Digital Toolkit is relevant for anyone working in the charity sector – from frontline staff through to experienced digital managers, senior leaders and trustees. Everyone has a role to play in successful digital transformation and can benefit from this free resource.

It covers the basics of digital such as mapping your audience and developing your digital strategy; understanding the benefits of different marketing channels and measuring success. Leadership; fundraising; governance and risk are also particular areas of focus.

Key influencers
Charities and key influencers have been involved in developing the toolkit and have shared their own experiences and insights. This includes Martha Lane Fox CBE, who has written the foreword; the Charity Commission and Diabetes UK. Marie Curie has also shared its own digital transformation journey and revealed how tapping into digital can reap rewards for fundraising and income generation.

The toolkit also looks ahead to the future; at digital trends which will disrupt the sector and reshape the way supporters behave and engage with charities. If the future is digital, the right skills are crucial. Here, Breast Cancer Care shares advice on the skills your organisation needs to get digital right and how to upskill staff if there is a digital skills gap.

For more information about Skills Platform or the Charity Digital Toolkit 2017, visit www.skillsplatform.org/charitydigitaltoolkit

To read the full Charity Digital News Article click here.


New Reporting Obligation to HMRC Affects Charities Making Grants

Those charities which receive more than half of their income from financial investments in any year need to check whether they have an obligation to report details of their grant recipients to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). If more than half of your charity’s income is from financial investments and those investments are managed for you in whole or in part by a broker, fund manager, independent financial adviser, or wealth manager then you may need to carry out checks on your grant recipients and make a report to HMRC to meet your obligations under the ‘Common Reporting Standard’.

The Common Reporting Standard is a global agreement to combat offshore tax evasion through the sharing of financial information between tax administrations. For more information on the Common Reporting Standard and the reporting requirements please refer to guidance issued by HMRC.

To read other Charity Commission news click here.

Want to keep up to date with all the Charity Commissions news, guidance and events? Make sure you’re following them on Twitter @ChtyCommission, LinkedIn, and sign up to their blog from their website.

Source: Charity Commission News Issue 56 – February 2017


Regulatory Alerts Issued For Fundraising Charities

The Charity Commission recently issued an alert to promote the new Charities Act fundraising rules, which came in to force on 1 November 2016. The new rules affect:

 the trustees’ annual reports of larger charities that fundraise from the public
 the agreements that must be in place when third party fundraisers raise money for charities

The changes will help charities demonstrate their commitment to protecting donors and the public from poor fundraising practices. The new law will also help to ensure that fundraising standards form part of the agreements between charities and any commercial participators or professional fundraisers with whom they work. Find out how your charity is affected by the new provisions, and when compliance with them is required. You can also look at Charity reporting and accounting: the essentials (CC15d) which have been updated to reflect the new requirements.

The Charity Commission also issued joint alerts with the Fundraising Regulator about the importance of following data protection law when handling donors’ personal information, and about complying with their legal trustee duties when working with third party fundraisers as set out in the Commission’s guidance Charity fundraising: a guide to trustee duties (CC20).

To read other Charity Commission news click here.

Want to keep up to date with all the Charity Commissions news, guidance and events? Make sure you’re following them on Twitter @ChtyCommission, LinkedIn, and sign up to their blog from their website.

Source: Charity Commission News Issue 56 – February 2017


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