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Heritage Lottery Fund – Funding to Restore Neglected Historic Buildings

The next deadline for the Heritage Lottery Fund’s Heritage Enterprise programme is the 31st August 2017.

The Heritage Enterprise programme supports enterprising heritage organisations in rescuing neglected historic buildings and restoring them to viable productive use. The cost of repairing a neglected historic building is often so high that restoration simply isn’t commercially viable. Heritage Enterprise makes such schemes possible by funding some of the repair costs with grants.

Grants of between £100,000 and £5million will be awarded to meet conservation deficits i.e. where the existing value of the historic asset plus the cost of bringing it back into use is greater than the end value of the asset following development completion. Not for profit organisations, or partnerships led by such organisations can apply via a two stage process with Start-up grants also available for pre-application viability appraisals.

HLF says, “Historic buildings can attract thriving businesses and boost economic growth. And yet many lie vacant and derelict because of the high costs involved in rescuing them.

Heritage Enterprise can help communities repair derelict historic places, giving them productive new uses. By funding the repair costs and making these buildings commercially viable, we hope to breathe new life into vacant sites. Not-for-profit organisations work with private partners to generate economic growth, and create jobs and opportunities in those places that need it the most.”

For more information on this grant click here.


Maker-Centric Taster Session

The University of Wolverhampton is looking for participants to get involved with their Maker-Centric Project, which examines the power of making and crafts in helping people to understand and play a part in their communities. Participants don’t need to have any prior experience of crafts as this opportunity is open to everyone regardless of their crafting ability or experience.

Want to find out more? Then why not come along to the taster session being held on:

Monday 19th June 2017, 2-4pm at University of Wolverhampton, Room MK204, George Wallis (MK) Building, Molineux Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1DT.

Alternatively for more details on the taster sessions or to confirm your attendance at the session please contact Kauser Husain via email at k.husain2@wlv.ac.uk or makercentricblog@gmail.com.

You can also visit their website at http://www.maker-centric.comto find out more information on this exciting new opportunity.


Maker-Centric Project – Participants Needed!

The University of Wolverhampton is looking for participants to get involved with their Maker-Centric Project, which examines the power of making and crafts in helping people to understand and play a part in their communities. Participants don’t need to have any prior experience of crafts as this opportunity is open to everyone regardless of their crafting ability or experience.

The University is working in collaboration with Craftspace (a charity that initiates artistic programmes which stimulate creative excellence and understanding of contemporary crafts in the widest social and cultural contexts) on the project and there will be an opportunity to network with other groups and discover what else is happening in the area.

Participants are being sought by The University who will be running a series of workshops in June 2017, in which people from the Black Country will be invited to create an object that responds to the unique industrial and social heritage of their area.

All workshops are entirely free for participants and include:

  • materials and travel,
  • free access to state of the art fabrication technology at FabLab, Sandwell,
  • guided tour of the Wolverhampton Art School exhibition,
  • specialist artist talks,
  • artist led walks,
  • photography sessions and much more.

You will also have the chance to showcase your creation at an event to be held in London.

Not sure if this is for you? Then why not come along to a taster session to find out more and see what will be involved. You’ll need to get in touch with Kauser Husain via email at k.husain2@wlv.ac.uk or makercentricblog@gmail.com for more details on the taster sessions or alternatively the University can come out to your organisation to explore and explain the project in more detail.

You can also visit their website at www.maker-centric.com for more details on this exciting new opportunity.


Creative Black Country Desi Pub Crawl: Sunday 28th May 2017

Hop onto the Creative Black Country’s Desi Pub bus for a tour around the Black Country’s best kept secret; its Indian pubs.

Tours start at 3pm on Thursday 28th May 2017 from The Red Cow (296 High Street, Smethwick, B66 3NL ) where you can meet the landlords, see some Desi Pub art, enjoy your complimentary pint and order some seriously tasty Desi Pub food, before you set off for the tour.

Tickets are £10 and includes transport to various Desi Pubs, complimentary pint on arrival at The Red Cow, Desi Pub coasters and map of Desi Pub trail.

Pubs on the crawls include: The Red Cow (Smethwick), The Ivy Bush (Smethwick), The Fourways (Rowley Regis), The Red Lion (West Bromwich), The Prince of Wales (West Bromwich), The Sportsman (West Bromwich), The Island Inn (West Bromwich).

The tour starts at The Red Cow and finishes at The Prince of Wales in West Bromwich with two other Desi Pubs being visited along the way.

For more information about the tour email info@creativeblackcountry.co.uk

The event is part of Southbank Centre’s Alchemy – a contemporary festival exploring the cultural links between the UK and South Asia – through live performance, talks, film, exhibitions, workshops and music.

#AlchemyBC


Poles In Birmingham-West Bromwich Are Celebrating Their Heritage and Culture

Join Polish Expats Association and Creative Black Country for a Polish Heritage Day on 06 May 2017 at West Bromwich Town Hall and celebrate openness, appreciation and better understanding between our communities in Birmingham.

The project is part of the Polish Heritage Day initiative by the Polish Embassy in London along with over 40 events planned across the UK and supported by the Polish Consulates in London, Manchester, and Edinburgh.

Programme include:
-Presentation of ‘From Exile to Freedom’- exhibition presenting stories of different generations of Polish Migrants
– Traditional folk papercuts workshop
– Craft stalls
– Polish food
– Live music and more!

Taking place on 6-7 May 2017 and intended as an annual festival, Polish Heritage Day is planned for the weekend after the symbolic date of 3 May, when in 1791 Poland proclaimed its modern codified constitution as the first country in Europe and the second in the world after the United States – a symbol of freedom and equality. 2 May is also celebrated in Poland and in Polish communities around the world as the Polish Diaspora Day and Polish Flag Day.

A number of city councils across the country have already expressed their support for the project by offering patronage and raising the white-and-red flags on town halls during the festival as a gesture of openness and symbol of friendship. A virtual map of planned events can be discovered at Polish Embassy’s website.

Project’s logo is based on the design of the white-and-red chequerboard – a symbol painted on the Polish airplanes during the Battle of Britain 1940, in which Polish pilots constituted the second largest Allied contingent after the British. During World War II and later in the time of communism, the United Kingdom was the refuge of the Polish Government-in-Exile and free Poles. The Polish community is a mixture of the descendants of those wartime and anti-communist exiles and those who decided to move to Britain after Poland joined the EU in 2004.

Polish nationals are now the largest minority in the UK, estimated at 984,000. Poles have opened 30,000 businesses in the UK , and pride themselves in the highest rate of individuals in employment or higher education among all ethnic groups in Britain – at 92 per cent.

For more information about the event, please visit https://www.facebook.com/events/1882562412002704/  or follow #PLHeritageDay on social media.


Hip Hop Heritage

Tell us about yourself and your affiliation to the organisation you are involved in.

My name is Martin Jones, and I’m currently the Treasurer of Hip Hop Heritage. My main claim to fame is that I was an entertainment agent in the 1980s, and actor/musician/celeb Goldie’s manager and agent from 1984-90.

Tell us about your organisation and what it does for your local community.

We are an unincorporated charitable association. Our mission is to document and promote the work of Hip Hop’s early pioneers in the UK.

We ran a successful Heritage Lottery Fund ‘Our Heritage’ programme in 2014-15, called ‘The Early Years of UK Hip Hop Archive Project’, based on my photo collection from the 1980s.

What is your organisation’s proudest achievement?

We created and catalogued a 1,500 image record called the ‘Zulu Dawn Archive’, which is based at Dudley Archives and can be viewed at blackcountryhistory.org

In our early days we staged two exhibitions at The Public arts centre in West Bromwich.

Our dancers also hold the Guinness World Record for the most performers motion-captured in real time (19), surpassing the previous record set during filming for Lord of the Rings (15).

What is the most valuable lesson you have learnt about working with people in your local community?

It took us a while to find the right people for our committee. It’s not easy, and takes time to find people who are genuinely committed to your goals and who are in it for the right reasons – however now we have an excellent committee.

What is your experience of support received from SCVO?

We were delighted with the help and advice we received from the SCVO Small Groups Advisor when we were setting up the organisation.

What are your plans for the future and some of the challenges you face?

Our plans include an exhibition called ‘Afterlife’, which we hope to stage at Wolverhampton Arena Theatre’s Artsfest. The show uses the motion capture files of top B Boy breakdancers of the 1980s that we recorded in 2015, and turns them into animated avatars, which will then form part of our archive.

We will also document the technical design process of how the dance figures are modelled and animated.

They will become a permanent, detailed record of the dancers’ trademark moves from the early era of B Boying, recorded while the dancers were still able to perform their moves.

How can SCVO help support your organisation in the future?

We have found the SCVO Meet the Funders events very useful, to identify potential funding sources and to meet others who are in the same position and encountering the same issues as us.


Spotlight on Creative Black Country

1. Tell us what you do.

Creative Black Country (CBC) is a three year campaign, funded by Arts Council England’s Creative People and Places project, which aims to make the most of creative talent in the Black Country.

We work with local people to discover, explore and grow an exciting and meaningful programme of arts activity in Sandwell, Walsall and Wolverhampton. We have a range of projects where we engage with communities putting them at the heart of each idea. In 2016, two of the major projects included Imagine That! and Desi Pubs.

Open Access Awards
We have Open Access awards which supports activities that build audiences and is open to individuals, groups and organisations in Sandwell, Walsall and Wolverhampton. If a project builds audiences, connects local people with professional artists and brings great performance, art and creativity to the Black Country, Open Access could help make that project happen.

To apply or for more information click here.

Groundwork Groups
We work with community groups as ‘Groundworks‘ which offers local community groups the opportunity to start an exciting creative journey, supported by an Arts Advisor to help develop and shape the groups creative ideas and a Development Worker who offers support in areas such as:  governance, funding, training and information.

Groundworks groups, as part of the journey, have the opportunity for their members to Go and See a wide range of performance and visual arts to spark off ideas of their own.

2. What is your proudest achievement?

In our short time, CBC has had many proud moments but programming and organising the 2016 Sandwell Arts Festival was a brilliant one!  Two fantastic days of performances, workshops, pop up cinema, music and the famous Ceramic Garden were offered to the Sandwell public. We worked with volunteers whose enthusiasm helped to make the festival really special!

3. What is your experience of support received from SCVO

CBC makes the most of SCVO’s connections particularly around knowledge of local relationships which connects the voluntary, the arts and cultural sector.

4. What is the most valuable lesson you have learnt about working with people in Sandwell?

One of the most valuable lessons has been listening to what people wish to see in their area and working with Sandwell individuals and groups to help turn their arts and cultural ideas into reality.

5. What are your plans for the future and some of the challenges you face?

We have an exciting year ahead, keep an eye on our website, as we are currently firming up future events or better still sign up to our newsletter.

The challenges are no different to other organisation i.e. around funding and sustainability.

6. How can SCVO help to support your organisation in the future?

SCVO can carry on supporting groups that CBC connects with and help us to spread the word about what’s happening in Sandwell which are linked to the activities that we are developing in partnership with others.

For more information on how to get involved please contact Creative Black Country on 0121 525 1127 or alternatively drop us a line via email at info@creativeblackcountry.co.uk


Made in Oldbury: Opening the Archives

Made in Oldbury: Opening the Archives is a fantastic opportunity to see some rare archive materials selected by independent photographic curator Pete James along with Maureen Waldron and Ian Gray from Sandwell Community History and Archives Service. Dr Terry Daniels from Oldbury and Langley History Societies will be on hand to share some of his personal archive of the area.

The event includes film footage from Albright and Wilson from the early 1070’s, artist interpretations of archive material from Jain Mckay and Josh Whitehouse, and special performance by Black Country poets Billy Spake Mon and Brendan Hawthorne, offering their own unique reflections on industrial history in word and verse.

The event will be taking place on:
Saturday 25th February 2017, 2pm till 4.30pm at Zion Methodist Church Hall, Langley Green Road, Langley, B69 4TP

Come along and share some of your stories and personal memorabilia or if you are interested in researching some of the archives, please get in touch. For further information please contact Kate Jackson – Project Coordinator either by email at kate@katejacksphoto.co.uk or call 077203 28116


The World’s First Punjabi Pub Signs

desi-pubsThe World’s first Punjabi pub signs will be hung at seven Desi pubs across the Black Country this month celebrating 18-months of artist and landlord collaboration for a landmark project.

When Avtar Singh Johal of the Indian Workers’ Association invited Malcolm X to Smethwick to highlight the segregation faced in pubs and bars little did he know that some 50 years later many of those very pubs that had refused entry to the workers would actually be saved by the entrepreneurial community.

The civil rights campaigner (who visited on 12 February 1965 and was assassinated just nine days later) came to the region because he was “disturbed by reports that coloured people in Smethwick are being treated badly”.

This significant event is just one that has been captured by Creative Black Country commissioned artists and Desi Pub landlords in the Black Country over the past year producing a new body of work that tells the stories of migration from the Punjab to the region.

Via the stunning stained glass windows at The Red Lion (West Bromwich) featuring the Punjabi Workers Association and Malcolm X in the 60’s; a beautiful large-scale mosaic mural depicting dancers and dhol drummers for the Prince of Wales; portrait photography at the Ivy Bush, The Fourways, The Sportsman and Island Inn; and a large oil painting of the landlords and staff at The Red Cow, the extraordinary stories about migration, survival, love and food are told.

Landlords Beera, Jinder, Jeet, Dal, Slack and Amrik, have opened their pub doors to six artists sharing their personal life stories and experiences over a pint. The pubs have helped shape bespoke creations which capture the heart and soul of each venue and their punters.

Alongside the artwork will be the World’s first bespoke Punjabi Pub signs produced for permanent display at each pub.

Creative Black Country collaborated with Nottingham’s New Art Exchange (NAE) to enlist Smethwick-born visual artist Hardeep Pandhal to create the images for the signs, which were then given to specialist pub sign painter Andrew Grundon to produce.

“The handcrafted pub signs are not only works of contemporary art but they are bold landmarks that unify the pubs and narrate this remarkable story.” comments Creative Black Country’s Artist Director Parminder Dosanjh. “The landlords have been very much involved in the process of creating the work.”

Desi pubs is an ongoing art project in partnership with New Arts Exchange, BBC English Regions, Midland Pub Association, Southbank Centre  supported by Arts Council England’s Creative People and Places.

To read this article in full click here.


Sandwell Celebrates Heritage Open Days

Heritage

Amazing historic buildings in Sandwell will be sharing some of their secrets and stories when they open their doors to the public as part of national Heritage Open Days.

From September 8 to 11 lots of events and activities are lined up showcase the borough’s fascinating past including the childhood home of one of the most famous historical characters in American history.

Visitors can learn what West Bromwich was like in the 1650s, enjoy live music, talks, walks, open days, food tasting, canal heritage and much more.

“It is a great opportunity to tell the stories of the people and places around us and for visitors to get a glimpse behind the scenes at buildings or areas not usually open to the public or even just enjoy a great family day out with some of the events on offer’ said  Councillor Richard Marshall, cabinet member for leisure.

“‘It is fantastic for Sandwell’s Heritage to be showcased alongside the heritage of other areas around the county – we have some amazing places to be proud of which are as fascinating and as important as historic buildings and sites anywhere in the country and we really want people to appreciate their own inheritance and the importance of these sites, what is great about all these activities is it’s free to explore.”

You can find out where you can discover or what activities you can enjoy across the Sandwell by clicking here


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